Cambridge Cycling Club

Time Trialling

Ken Platts - National VTTA record holder

Time trialling started when the cycling governing body voluntarily banned bunched, or massed-start, road racing as a result of a horse and carriage incident in 1894. A few rebels, the most high profile of whom was Frederick Thomas Bidlake objected to racing being held only on closed tracks and consequently set up a rival organistion, the Road Records Association. The RRA held races on country roads early in the morning on pre-determined courses. So as not to attract attention, riders set off at minute intervals; wore black clothing and did not carry race numbers. To maintain secrecy, courses were allocated secret codes which continue to this day.

The rider with the lowest overall elapsed time is normally the winner. On occasions a handicap system is operated where adjustments are made to take into account age or previous performances. Distances are usually 10, 25, 50 and 100 miles. There are also races over 12 and 24 hours where the winner is the rider who covers the greatest number of miles.

The regulatory body for domestic time trials is now Cycling Time Trials (CTT). Time trials are organised by cycling clubs for and on behalf of CTT in accordance with their Regulations. CTT recommends that adult riders wear an approved helmet and this is compulsory for juniors.

Riders must adhere to the Highway Code whilst competing. Specifically, this means giving way at junctions and roundabouts to others having priority and keeping to your side of the road when exiting corners.

Open events

CCC is affiliated to the Eastern Counties Cycling Association (ECCA) and Norlond TT Combine whose member clubs organise events in our region. Entry must be by an official CTT Entry Form, with a closing date that is usually just under two weeks before the event. See our members results here (Enter either a rider's name or Cambridge CC in the filter box)

We are sponsoring two open events in 2017 (details on the homepage calendar)

We need members assistance to run these events. If you can help please contact our Time Trial Secretary

Our members riding these events create a marshalling obligation for the following season, which for us in 2017 is: -

If you can help with our obligation, please contact our Time Trial Secretary

Club events

Club events are held on Thursday evenings between April and August. Go to the Time Trials menu tab for the schedule of events. You can ride these events by simply turning up and signing on. Guest riders sign on 20 minutes before the start so we suggest members sign on before this to ensure a ride.

With effect from 1 June 2017 an active, rear facing light, either flashing or constant, will be compulsory whilst riding our events.

Entry is free for 1st and 2nd claim members, who in return are expected to help on at least two occasions with either marshalling* or organising.

There is a £3 entry fee for members of other clubs.

If you are not a member of a cycling club, you can join Cambridge CC as a day member - £5 (or join as a full member - £20).

If you are under 18 years old please also read our Juniors page.

We run two competitions; one for time trial machines and the other for road bikes. To qualify for the road bike competition, tri-bars, aero helmets and deep rim wheels greater than 35mm are not allowed.

Annually we hold a couple of "Come and Try It" events on the Newton circuit. These events are differentiated from our normal club events in that you do not have to be a member of a cycling club. You must be over 12 years old and if under age 18 we require Parental Consent. No special equipment or clothing is necessary, just a roadworthy bike. There is no charge to enter these events. Club members are not given preferential treatment; it is a case of "first come; first served".

Here is a CTT article on riding your first time trial.

If you would like to speak to someone contact our Time Trial Secretary.

Organisers information can be found on the Legal/Doc Store page.

*Marshalling - Modern traffic conditions make it essential that a marshal should do no more than indicate the precise spot at which a rider should turn or the direction they should take. The responsibility for safely negotiating a turn or any other change of direction must rest with the rider alone.